next step in energy blog hero

Today, modern utilities and grid operators are utilizing battery technology like never before. The next step in tapping the potential of energy storage is putting together thousands of batteries to form an energy network that utilities can use to deliver immediate value for the electric system. Tesla can now bundle Powerwall and Powerpack batteries into a single portfolio, also called aggregation, to make the grid cleaner and more efficient. Meanwhile, Powerwall customers who allow Tesla and the utilities to use their battery when energy demand is highest will not only have home backup power, but will also receive compensation for its use on the grid.

To introduce this program, Tesla and Green Mountain Power, a utility in Vermont, are working together to bundle Powerwall and Powerpack batteries into a single resource of shared energy for the first time. Green Mountain Power will install Powerpacks on utility land and deploy up to 2,000 Powerwall batteries to homeowners within the utility’s service territory, which will enable more renewable energy and increase grid efficiency. For only $15 a month or a $1,500 one-time fee, customers will receive backup power to their home for the next 10 years, eliminating the need for traditional, manually-controlled backup generators that use fossil fuel. At the same time, Tesla and Green Mountain Power will provide a variety of grid services using the network of installed Powerwall batteries, delivering dynamic capacity (energy reserves that can be dispatched when they are needed most) and additional grid stability, while sustainably lowering costs for all utility customers. Tesla will also work with Green Mountain Power to dispatch the aggregated resource into New England’s wholesale electricity markets, producing additional savings for customers in the region.

The Green Mountain Power program is just the beginning. Tesla is working with energy retailers, grid operators, utilities and aggregators across the globe to unlock the ability for Tesla batteries to deliver grid services while providing reliable power at all times of day. As the deployment of Tesla batteries continues to accelerate, we can scale the adoption of renewable energy, cost-effectively modernize our aging infrastructure, and improve the resilience of our electric grid to benefit everyone.

To find out more about how to aggregate Tesla batteries to strengthen the electric grid and accelerate the transition to sustainable energy, visit tesla.com/utilities.

Source :https://www.tesla.com/blog/next-step-in-energy-storage-aggregation

Tesla’s mission is to accelerate the world’s transition to a sustainable energy future by creating products that are so compelling, there is no alternative. Solar energy has always been part of our master plan, and we recognized the need for a roof that is simultaneously affordable, durable, beautiful and integrated with battery storage.

Solar Roof complements a home’s architecture while turning sunlight into electricity. With an integrated Powerwall, energy collected during the day is stored and made available any time, effectively turning a home into a personal utility. Solar energy can be generated, stored and used day and night, providing uninterrupted power even if the grid goes down.

Affordability
Solar Roof is more affordable than conventional roofs because in most cases, it ultimately pays for itself by reducing or eliminating a home’s electricity bill. Consumer Reports estimates that a Solar Roof for an average size U.S. home would need to cost less than $24.50 per square foot to be cost competitive with a regular roof. The cost of Solar Roof is less. The typical homeowner can expect to pay $21.85 per square foot for Solar Roof,1 and benefit from a beautiful new roof that also increases the value of their home.

Solar Roof uses two types of tiles—solar and non-solar. Looking at the roof from street level, the tiles look the same. Customers can select how many solar tiles they need based on their home’s electricity consumption. For example, households that charge an electric vehicle every day may want more solar tiles on their roof.

In doing our own research on the roofing industry, it became clear that roofing costs vary widely, and that buying a roof is often a worse experience than buying a car through a dealership. Initial contracts tend to be overly optimistic, and later customers face hidden costs that were never mentioned up front.

At Tesla, we believe in transparency and putting the customer in control. That’s why we created a Solar Roof calculator that lets homeowners estimate the upfront price of Solar Roof, as well as the value of the energy it can generate for their home. The calculator is based on factors like roof size, the average local price of electricity, and how much sunlight a neighborhood receives throughout the year.

As shown in the graph below, the cost of our non-solar tiles is comparable to regular roofing tiles.2 Although the cost of our solar tiles is more expensive up front, it can be more than offset by the value of energy the tiles produce.3 In many cases, the reduction in a home’s electricity bill over time will be greater than the cost of the roof.

 

Design & Durability
Solar Roof will be available in a variety of designs, including Smooth and Textured (available this year) and Tuscan and Slate (available early 2018). Made with tempered glass, Solar Roof tiles are more than three times stronger than standard roofing tiles, yet half the weight. They do not degrade over time like asphalt or concrete. Solar Roof is the most durable roof available and the glass itself will come with a warranty for the lifetime of your house, or infinity, whichever comes first.

Availability
Customers may place an order for Solar Roof today on the Tesla website. Installations of Solar Roof will begin in the U.S. this summer and we expect installations outside the U.S. to begin in 2018.


 Source  : https://www.tesla.com/blog/solar-roof

gigafactory announcement

Tesla’s mission is to accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy through increasingly affordable electric vehicles in addition to renewable energy generation and storage. At the heart of these products are batteries. Today at the Gigafactory, Tesla and Panasonic begin mass production of lithium-ion battery cells, which will be used in Tesla’s energy storage products and Model 3.

The high performance cylindrical “2170 cell” was jointly designed and engineered by Tesla and Panasonic to offer the best performance at the lowest production cost in an optimal form factor for both electric vehicles and energy products.

Production of 2170 cells for qualification started in December and today, production begins on cells that will be used in Tesla’s Powerwall 2 and Powerpack 2 energy products. Model 3 cell production will follow in Q2 and by 2018, the Gigafactory will produce 35 GWh/year of lithium-ion battery cells, nearly as much as the rest of the entire world’s battery production combined.

The Gigafactory is being built in phases so that Tesla, Panasonic, and other partners can begin manufacturing immediately inside the finished sections and continue to expand thereafter. Our phased approach also allows us to learn and continuously improve our construction and operational techniques as we continue to drive down the cost of energy storage. Already, the current structure has a footprint of 1.9 million square feet, which houses 4.9 million square feet of operational space across several floors. And we are still less than 30 percent done. Once complete, we expect the Gigafactory to be the biggest building in the world.

With the Gigafactory online and ramping up production, our cost of battery cells will significantly decline due to increasing automation and process design to enhance yield, lowered capital investment per Wh of production, the simple optimization of locating most manufacturing processes under one roof, and economies of scale. By bringing down the cost of batteries, we can make our products available to more and more people, allowing us to make the biggest possible impact on transitioning the world to sustainable energy.

Finally, bringing cell production to the U.S. allows us to create thousands of American jobs. In 2017 alone, Tesla and Panasonic will hire several thousand local employees and at peak production, the Gigafactory will directly employ 6,500 people and indirectly create between 20,000 to 30,000 additional jobs in the surrounding regions.

 

source https://www.tesla.com/blog/battery-cell-production-begins-gigafactory

Tesla’s mission is to accelerate the world’s transition to a sustainable energy future by creating products that are so compelling, there is no alternative. Solar energy has always been part of our master plan, and we recognized the need for a roof that is simultaneously affordable, durable, beautiful and integrated with battery storage.

Solar Roof complements a home’s architecture while turning sunlight into electricity. With an integrated Powerwall, energy collected during the day is stored and made available any time, effectively turning a home into a personal utility. Solar energy can be generated, stored and used day and night, providing uninterrupted power even if the grid goes down.

Affordability
Solar Roof is more affordable than conventional roofs because in most cases, it ultimately pays for itself by reducing or eliminating a home’s electricity bill. Consumer Reports estimates that a Solar Roof for an average size U.S. home would need to cost less than $24.50 per square foot to be cost competitive with a regular roof. The cost of Solar Roof is less. The typical homeowner can expect to pay $21.85 per square foot for Solar Roof,1 and benefit from a beautiful new roof that also increases the value of their home.

Solar Roof uses two types of tiles—solar and non-solar. Looking at the roof from street level, the tiles look the same. Customers can select how many solar tiles they need based on their home’s electricity consumption. For example, households that charge an electric vehicle every day may want more solar tiles on their roof.

In doing our own research on the roofing industry, it became clear that roofing costs vary widely, and that buying a roof is often a worse experience than buying a car through a dealership. Initial contracts tend to be overly optimistic, and later customers face hidden costs that were never mentioned up front.

At Tesla, we believe in transparency and putting the customer in control. That’s why we created a Solar Roof calculator that lets homeowners estimate the upfront price of Solar Roof, as well as the value of the energy it can generate for their home. The calculator is based on factors like roof size, the average local price of electricity, and how much sunlight a neighborhood receives throughout the year.

As shown in the graph below, the cost of our non-solar tiles is comparable to regular roofing tiles.2 Although the cost of our solar tiles is more expensive up front, it can be more than offset by the value of energy the tiles produce.3 In many cases, the reduction in a home’s electricity bill over time will be greater than the cost of the roof.

 

Design & Durability
Solar Roof will be available in a variety of designs, including Smooth and Textured (available this year) and Tuscan and Slate (available early 2018). Made with tempered glass, Solar Roof tiles are more than three times stronger than standard roofing tiles, yet half the weight. They do not degrade over time like asphalt or concrete. Solar Roof is the most durable roof available and the glass itself will come with a warranty for the lifetime of your house, or infinity, whichever comes first.

Availability
Customers may place an order for Solar Roof today on the Tesla website. Installations of Solar Roof will begin in the U.S. this summer and we expect installations outside the U.S. to begin in 2018.


 Source  : https://www.tesla.com/blog/solar-roof

A solar battery is a rechargeable battery that integrates a solar cell with battery power storage

A second meaning of solar battery (Typ II) are rechargeable batteries which have been developed specifically for use in photovoltaic systems or are just used for. They are used especially in stand-alone systems for storage of energy produced by solar panels and batteries as a buffer when major consumer operation. [1] Often, the term is also commonly used for built-in solar power applications batteries, even if they are not specified for it. Contents 1 History 2 used batteries (Typ II) 3 See also 4 References History The first solar battery was developed in 2014 by researchers at Ohio State University.

The researchers used a dye-sensitized solar cell using ruthenium that stores the power that it uses air to decompose and re-form lithium peroxide.[2] It used three electrodes rather than the typical four. It featured a lithium plate base, two layers of electrode separated by a thin sheet of porous carbon and a titanium gauze mesh that played host to a dye-sensitive photoelectrode. Porous materials allowed the battery's ions to oxidize into lithium peroxide, which chemically decomposes into lithium ions and stored as lithium metal. The device used conventional liquid electrolyte consisting of part salt and part solvent (perchlorate mixed with organic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide.[3] In 2015 the same team announced modifications to their design such that compared with traditional lithium iodine batteries, energy savings reached 20 percent. The new design no longer needs air to pass through it in order to function. Water was the solvent and lithium iodide is the salt. The result is a water-based electrolyte and a prototype now classed as an aqueous flow battery.

The device is topped with a solid solar panel in a single solid sheet. Over 25 charge/discharge cycles, the battery released around 3.3 volts. While typical batteries are charged with 3.6 volts and discharge at 3.3 volts, the solar flow battery only needed 2.9 volts to charge with the solar panel making up the difference, almost 20 percent. Another team wired four perovskite solar cells in series to enhance the voltage and photo-charge lithium batteries with 7.8% efficiency.

Perovskite solar cells have active materials with a crystalline structure identical to the mineral perovskite. Perovskite cells convert a broader spectrum of sunlight into electricity than conventional silicon-based cells.[4] used batteries (Typ II) The most commonly used for solar batteries battery type was in the past, the lead-acid battery. For its use of low price per storable energy quantity, the achievable maintenance, the low self-discharge and the relatively high efficiency of about 80% spoke. The losses in lead-acid batteries can be explained in part by the outgassing of hydrogen-oxygen during charging.

With maintenance-free lead-acid batteries the gas emissions are reduced. Solar-lead batteries vary in their internal mechanical structure of the other lead-acid batteries, they are optimized for a particularly long service life, cycle stability and behavior at low discharge. Typical are numbers of cycles of 1200 (with a depth of discharge of about 80%) to a residual capacity of 80%, since then a battery is considered defective from. Maintenance-free lead-acid batteries have the advantage that there are no or only forms a minimum stratification she sure but allow only a much smaller number of cycles from 400 to 600. An additional circulation of acid prevents completely stratification and the lead-acid batteries. This is especially important in stationary operation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_battery